Flavor Trends, Strategies and Solutions for Menu Development

5 Sauces that Span Seafood Options Simple and versatile sauces to extend flavor-building options for seafood

Gremolata, that zingy, bright herb sauce that typically sees parsley, garlic and lemon zest, works beautifully with roasted or grilled fish and takes well to signature additions—this version has mace and olive oil.
PHOTO CREDIT: MICHAEL PIAZZA / TWO IF BY SEA

Pristine seafood doesn’t necessarily require a sauce. But having one can help accentuate the personality of the fish or shellfish on the plate and add color and texture to the overall dish.

The sauce can be as simple as half of a lemon that’s been charred on its cut side—the heat brings out the sugars in the citrus while maintaining some of the fruit’s acidity. It can be a chef’s twist on a classic rémoulade that includes a trendy ingredient but doesn’t push diners too far out of their comfort zone. Or it can be a bright pop of color that works as a dipping sauce for both the seafood and the vegetables on the plate.

Here are five simple and versatile sauces to extend flavor-building options for seafood.

Red Pepper Coulis

Profile: Bright, sweet and sour
Ingredients: Roasted red bell peppers, olive oil, butter, red wine vinegar, mint

Gremolata

Profile: Earthy and fresh
Ingredients: Parsley, lemon zest, garlic, mace, olive oil

Seared Lemons

Profile: Bright but sweet
Ingredients: Halved lemons and a heat source

Seaweed Butter

Profile: Salty, earthy and rich
Ingredients: Butter, dried kelp or dulse, Pernod, cracked pepper and ground allspice

Not-so-classic Rémoulade

Profile: Tangy and creamy
Ingredients: Greek yogurt, mustard, Worcestershire, garlic, scallions, shallot, celery, parsley

From the special Sept/Oct 2018 Seafood issue of Flavor & the Menu magazine. Read this issue online or check if you qualify for a free print subscription.

This story tagged under:



 

About The Author

mm

Barton Seaver is on a mission to restore our relationship with the ocean, the land, and with each other—through dinner. He has translated his illustrious career as a chef into his leadership in the area of sustainable seafood innovations. Barton is a firm believer that human health depends on the health of the ocean and that the best way to connect the two is at the dinner table.